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Britain’s standing depends on keeping its word – Boyce
Law Society of England and Wales President I Stephanie Boyce

14 Jun 2022 / international Print

Britain’s standing depends on keeping its word – Boyce

The Law Society of England and Wales has issued a statement after the British Government unveiled its Northern Ireland Protocol Bill.

Law Society of England and Wales President I Stephanie Boyce said: “Britain’s standing in the world depends in part on it being known as a nation that keeps its word. 

“The Northern Ireland Protocol Bill represents a direct challenge to the rule of law as it gives the UK Government the power to break international law. 

“This new legislation would give the government the right to suspend elements of the Internal Market Act concerning Northern Ireland, which underpins the UK’s trade deal with the EU. 

Threatens agreement

“The bill therefore threatens the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement, which in effect risks a no-deal scenario and a potential trade war with the EU.  

“The rule of law is undermined if the UK Government takes the view that laws – international or domestic – can be broken. If a government breaks laws, it breaks trust with its own citizens and with international partners,” President Boyce said.

 

Gazette Desk
Gazette.ie is the daily legal news site of the Law Society of Ireland