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Control over working day increases with age

29 Sep 2020 / employment Print

Control over working day increases with age

A 2019 EU-wide labour force survey on work organisation and working time arrangements in Ireland, shows that employers were most likely to decide when workers in Ireland started and finished work (64.8%).

This is slightly higher than the corresponding figure for the EU27 at 60.8%.

The highest and lowest values across the EU27 member states were observed in Bulgaria (79.8%) and Finland (29.9%) respectively.

Employers here were more likely to decide when a woman started, and finished work compared to setting a man’s work schedule (70.6% against 59.9% respectively).

Trend

While the same trend was observed in the EU27, the gender gap (63.9% against 58.1%) was much smaller than for Ireland.

Just under one-in-five (17.3%) employed persons in Ireland were able to fully decide the start and end of their working day, which is slightly lower than the corresponding figure for the EU27 (18.1%).

The likelihood of the employed person being able to fully decide the start and end of their working day in Ireland increased with age, was highest for those working in the agriculture, forestry and fishing economic sector and lowest for those working in the human health and social work.

In Ireland, just over one-in-three employed persons (36.0%) reported that it would be very easy for them to take one or two hours off for personal or family reasons with one working day's notice, while the corresponding rate for the EU27 was 33.7%

Taking one or two hours off at short notice was more likely to be very easy for males than females (40.8% versus 30.5%) and was most likely for those working in the agriculture, forestry and fishing sector (73.9%) and for those working as managers, directors and senior officials (59.1%).

Leave

Taking leave for one or two days at short notice was more likely to be very easy for males than females, (21.0% versus 17.5%) and the ease of taking leave increased with age.

Employed males were more likely than employed females to indicate that they needed to adapt their working time at least once per week due to work demands (19.7% and 12.6% respectively).

While 13.4% of employed persons in Ireland indicated that they had been contacted for work purposes several times during their leisure time in the previous two months and were expected to act before the next working day; the corresponding figure for the EU27 was 10.1%.

Leisure time

Employed males were more likely than employed females to have reported being contacted during leisure time in the last two months and expected to act before the next working day at 16.7% and 9.5% respectively.

The EU results were released by Eurostat at 10am today.

Just under one-in-five (17.3%) employed persons in Ireland were able to fully decide the start and end of their working day which is slightly lower than the corresponding figure for the EU27 (18.1%).

The likelihood of the employed person being able to fully decide the start and end of their working day in Ireland increased with age: 8.6% for those aged 15-34 years, 17.4% for those aged 35-49 years and 26.9% for those aged 50-74 years.

Gazette Desk
Gazette.ie is the daily legal news site of the Law Society of Ireland