We use cookies to collect and analyse information on site performance and usage to improve and customise your experience, where applicable. View our Cookies Policy. Click Accept and continue to use our website or Manage to review and update your preferences.


Strictly necessary cookies

Cookie name Duration Cookie purpose
ASP.NET_SessionId Session This cookie holds the current session id (OPPassessment only)
.ASPXANONYMOUS 2 Months Authentication to the site
LSI 1 Year To remember cookie preference for Law Society websites (www.lawsociety.ie, www.legalvacancies.ie, www.gazette.ie)
FTGServer 1 Hour Website content ( /CSS , /JS, /img )
_ga 2 Years Google Analytics
_gat Session Google Analytics
_git 1 Day Google Analytics
AptifyCSRFCookie Session Aptify CSRF Cookie
CSRFDefenseInDepthToken Session Aptify defence cookie
EB5Cookie Session Aptify eb5 login cookie

Functional cookies

Cookie name Duration Cookie purpose
Zendesk Local Storage Online Support
platform.twitter.com Local Storage Integrated Twitter feed

Marketing cookies

Cookie name Duration Cookie purpose
fr 3 Months Facebook Advertising - Used for Facebook Marketing
_fbp 3 months Used for facebook Marketing
Probe into concept of parental alienation is launched

30 May 2022 / family law Print

Probe into concept of parental alienation

A Department of Justice public consultation has been launched on the issue of parental alienation in order to establish a deeper understanding of the concept.

Parental alienation is being cited more frequently in Irish courts, but there are varying jurisdictional approaches to the concept, and no reliable statistics on its prevalence in Ireland.

Parental alienation refers to a process through which a child becomes estranged from a parent as the result of the psychological manipulation of the other parent.

It may also refer to situations where one parent is wrongfully wielding influence to turn a child against the other parent.

‘Serious issue’

“This is a serious issue and an important consultation that will inform the department’s consideration of policy and law in this area,” said justice minister Helen McEntee. 

The Department of Justice wants to canvas views on parental alienation, to sit alongside research that it carried out on the issue in 2021.

In particular, the department is seeking:

  • Views of and/or experiences of parental alienation,
  • Its impact, and
  • How it might be responded to in the future.

Accounts of all types of experiences are sought; however, details of private family-court proceedings may not be included in any submissions.

Submissions will inform consideration of policy and law in this area.

Submissions should be made electronically, by email, to parentalalienation@justice.ie by 24 June. 

Submissions may be published in the future, and will fall under the provisions of the Freedom of Information Act 2014.

Solicitors, barristers, and journalists may attend family-law cases and publish reports, but no names, addresses or any other details that might identify the parties can be used.

“We know that parental alienation generally refers to a process through which a child becomes estranged from a parent as the result of the psychological manipulation of the other parent.

“It may also refer to situations where one parent is wrongfully influencing their child or children against the other parent.

 

“This is a serious issue and an important consultation that will inform the department’s consideration of policy and law in this area.”

Gazette Desk
Gazette.ie is the daily legal news site of the Law Society of Ireland