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Family support and friendship key to life satisfaction – CSO
Pic: UnSplash

20 Apr 2022 / WEllbeing Print

Family and friends key to life satisfaction – CSO data

Most adults in Ireland are satisfied with their life and there is a similar (89%) job satisfaction rating amongst employees, new CSO data shows.

Of those dissatisfied with their job, work pressures such as having to work long hours or more than their contracted hours, and lack of promotional opportunities affected job satisfaction.

Employees most likely to leave their job within the next six months are those who are temporary or part-time or are only with their current employer for a short period.

Of those dissatisfied with life, nearly six in ten (58%) found it hard to make ends meet, while almost one in seven (15%) were in poor health.

For those currently not in employment, the main barrier to return to work was long-standing health problems (28%), followed by caring for dependent family or friends (13%) and childcare issues (11%).

No barriers to work

There were no barriers preventing return to work for over one in five (21%) of those currently not working.

The CSO data is the second of three publications on the results of the Personal and Work-Life Balance Survey which was carried out in Q3, 2021 and covers life satisfaction, family and friendship support networks, and job satisfaction.

Statistician Maureen Delamere said the survey was carried out during the pandemic. 

“Despite living through more than 18 months of the pandemic and its associated restrictions on our personal and working lives, life and job satisfaction rates remained high amongst the Irish population when the survey was conducted during the months of July, August, and September 2021,” she said. 

Almost nine in ten were satisfied or very satisfied with their life, with many factors influencing this, such as physical health, the ability to make ends meet, support from family, friends, and neighbours, and whether a person is working or not.

The ability to make ends meet impacts significantly on life satisfaction.

Nearly six in ten (58%) dissatisfied with life struggled to make ends meet, more than double that of those contented with their life (27%).

People in poor health were more likely to be dissatisfied with life. Of those who were discontented with life, almost one in six (15%) were in very poor health, compared with just 2% of those who were happy with their life.

A further one-third of those dissatisfied with life said their self-perceived health status was only fair. The support that one gets from family, friends and neighbours plays an important role in how satisfied people are with their lives.

More than one third (36%) of people who get no support or help from family were dissatisfied with their life, compared with most (93%) of those who get a lot of support from family and are satisfied with their life.

Employment 

One’s employment status is a factor, Delamere continued.

More than nine in ten (92%) who were working were contented with life, compared with over four in five (82%) of those who were not in employment.

For those in employment, nine in ten (89%) were satisfied or very satisfied with their job. Of those who were dissatisfied with their job, work pressures played their part. 

While employees who are satisfied with their job also work long hours, more people who were dissatisfied in their job reported working long hours. Nearly nine in ten (88%) workers dissatisfied with their job said they must work very hard, compared with just short of eight in ten (78%) workers satisfied with their job. 

Similarly, of employees who were dissatisfied with their job, almost six in ten (59%) never have enough time to get their job done, compared with 44% of workers who are happy in their job.

Also, just short of half (49%) of those who have to work more than their contracted hours to get the job done are dissatisfied with their job, compared with four in ten (40%) employees who said that they were satisfied with their job.

Full-time workers with long service were more likely to turn down an offer of a better-paid job elsewhere than part-time workers with same service, or employees, full and part-time, with less service.

Better job

However, temporary, or part-time employees or those with less service were more likely to leave a job within the next six months, irrespective of any offer of a better job elsewhere.

Almost one quarter (24%) of temporary employees said they were likely to leave their job within the next six months, double the likelihood of their permanent equivalents (12%).

Part-time workers with a short length of service with their current employer are nearly twice as likely as their full-time equivalents to leave their organisation in the short term – 25% compared with one in seven (14%) full-time employees with less than five years’ service.

Looking at barriers to employment, Maureen Delamere said: “For those currently not in employment, the main barrier to returning to work was long-standing health problems (28%), followed by caring for dependent family or friends (13%) and childcare issues (11%). There were no barriers preventing return to the workplace for over one in five (21%) of those currently not working.”

Gazette Desk
Gazette.ie is the daily legal news site of the Law Society of Ireland