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Employment law | Legal Guides

Within two months of an employee starting work, the employer must legally provide him or her with a written statement outlining the terms of the employment. This is usually called a contract of employment. For more information, see the Terms of Employment (Information) Act 1994.

Employees should read this contract carefully, and keep a copy, as it sets out the rights and obligations of both employee and employer. If a question arises about these issues, it can usually be resolved by referring to the contract, unless the contract itself is in breach of employment law.